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Category Archives: Human Performance

Cut Your 5K Time With Pilates

Rick found this article in July’s edition of Men’s Health magazine that may be helpful for runners and tri-athletes. Actually, the benefits of Pilates are great for everyone, athlete or not.

We use Pilates in our athlete’s training programs and always notice HUGE benefits in their overall performance. From high school to the pros, everyone always comments about how they feel after their Pilates sessions. There’s truly no better workout to incorporate into your weekly program if you are looking to improve your core strength, flexibility, endurance, body awareness, breath control, and posture.

Ready to try some Mat Pilates at home or on the road?? Check out BEYONDMOTION.TV for some great Pilates workouts for all levels. Have questions? Email us at info@go2beyondmotion.com or comment below.

Baseball Pitching Coach – Greg Dombrowski now at BEYOND MOTION®

We are very fortunate to have Coach Dombrowski join Beyond Motion® this summer for #pitching lessons. Between the analytics, we can offer within the facility and the pro-style mound outside, it’s the perfect set-up for our pitching coach.

As a player, Greg led Rome Free Academy to 2 sectional championships and a trip to the State Final Four in 2003. He was named the Central New York Pitcher of the Year after the 2003 season as well as a 3 time all league, all Central New York and All-State player each of his 3 seasons at RFA. After graduation, he attended the University of Kentucky for four years playing in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) leading UK to their first-ever SEC championship in 2006. In 2006, he led the pitching staff with a 10-2 record and a 2.83 ERA. That year he beat five top 25 nationally ranked teams including a complete game in the NCAA regional over Notre Dame.

Greg played on 3 nationally ranked teams before leaving Kentucky with the second most wins in school history and is still the school record holder in career winning percentage with a 23-5 career record. He was named a 3rd team pre-season All-American his Junior season, an All-South Region performer, and was on the Roger Clemens Award Watch List 3 years, a list comprised of the top 50 pitchers in college baseball and given to the nation’s best.

 

After graduating from Kentucky with a degree in Kinesiology and Health Education, Greg played in the Cincinnati Reds Minor League System before succumbing to a career-ending shoulder injury requiring surgery.

For lessons call
239-254-9300 
ages 10 & up

Suspension Training with Bodhi

The Bodhi Suspension System: A Brief Review

Watch out TRX, there’s a new suspension system out on the fitness scene. The Bodhi suspension system is suspension training with a Pilates twist. Suspension training is a form of resistance training which uses a series of ropes along with your body weight. The ropes are attached to what is referred to as the anchor- a pipe, beam, or ring, either mounted to the wall or suspended from the ceiling. By using handles and/or straps attached to the ropes, you can perform an array of different dynamic movements. You’re basically working against gravity with the goal of developing strength, balance, flexibility, and joint mobility. Bodhi provides two anchor points and four possible points of suspension, whereas the TRX system has only a single anchor and two points of suspension. The additional points of suspension make more variations available and can provide a deeper movement experience.

In this humble Pilates teacher’s opinion; double the suspension, double the fun! 

The creator of the system is a woman named Khita Whyatt. When a car accident left her with significant paralysis to her left side, Khita took control and began conceptualizing her return to health. The shearing injury, which had damaged the connections between the two hemispheres of her brain, impeded communication between the right and left side and made it feel as though her brain could not find the left side and get it to function voluntarily. Along with the disconnect from her left side, she also could no longer contract her deeper muscles, including the transverse abdominals. Because of her strong understanding of the body (Khita was a Rolfer and longtime Pilates practitioner), she knew she would have to develop a system that would re-engage the non-responsive deep and mid layer muscles without being able to consciously feel or contract them. The way, she discovered, was through an anchor and a couple of ropes. Enter Bodhi.

Bodhi means “awaken” in Sanskrit. It was an aptly named system. When your body moves in and out of alignment with gravity, it stimulates a reaction in the deepest muscles; that of “hugging into the bone”. The body has something called the righting reflex, also known as the Labyrinthine righting reflex, for all you nerds out there. It refers to your body’s reflex to correct its orientation when taken out of the upright position. So when you lean into the ropes, it is your body’s reflexive reaction to contract even some of the deepest muscles which also provides support for your joints. You can also modify the intensity of the movement by adjusting your center of gravity, or by deepening the lean. The deeper the lean, the more the stabilizing muscles of the body, including the deep core, spinal erectors, and shoulder girdle have to work. Through her training on the Bodhi, Khita was able to re-educate her neuromuscular system to fire in a coordinated fashion and re-stimulate her sense of stability, mobility, and proper alignment. She has experienced a full recovery and I have been told if you met her, you’d never be able to tell she was partially paralyzed.

The fact that the Bodhi is suspended from two anchor points means you have a more anatomically correct set up which is more kinesthetically pleasing and allows for a greater variety of movement patterns. The Bodhi’s two suspension points also allow for a lot of creativity. When I participated in a Bodhi teacher training, I was amazed at the scope and diversity of the exercises that can be performed on this most simple of designs. Exercises can be done standing, lying face down and on your back (supine and prone, respectively, if you want to get technical) and even lying on your side.  Different points of suspension can be added to each exercise. For example, a row (an exercise where, leaning away from your anchor, you pull your arms toward you body retracting your shoulders together) with both feet planted of the floor feels very different from a row with one leg suspended by a strap. So, regardless of your fitness level, the Bodhi can accommodate your individual needs. An exercise can be of a beginner to an intermediate level or can be more advanced and athletic. As with any session you’ll experience at Beyond Motion, the difficulty level will be adjusted to be appropriate for you.

The Bodhi is a very intuitive system and provides a unique movement experience. We have had a lot of success implementing it into Pilates sessions with all of our clients. It’s a very cool experience that we recommend to anyone looking for a fun, innovative workout that challenges your body in an entirely new way. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and to book a session call 239-254-9300 or email us at: info@go2beyondmotion.com

Jamie

Beyond Motion Staff Personal Jamie

Pilates Day Celebration – Workouts

Every year on the first Saturday of May people around the world celebrate International Pilates Day. Knowing this year Pilates Day also falls on the same day as Cinco De Mayo and the Kentucky Derby, we decided to celebrate with everyone online… allowing you to participate in some of our favorite Pilates moves from the comfort of your own home.

 

 

And stay tuned for more videos and workouts by subscribing to our youtube channel BEYONDMOTION.TV

 

 

Need stronger glutes? Try this glute series and let us know if you’re feeling the burn…

 

 

Looking to build endurance and challenge your core? Try this series of 5… a secret weapon to help develop your six pack.

What is Impingement Syndrome?

A common diagnosis I see as a Physical Therapist is shoulder impingement syndrome. This syndrome involves the rotator cuff and bicep muscles. The syndrome is caused when the tendons become impinged as they pass through the subacromial space or when tendons are irritated by bony osteophytes(spurs) that form in the shoulder girdle. When this repeatedly occurs the tendons become inflamed and shoulder tendonitis develops. If not addressed it can lead to future rotator cuff tears. Prevention of these type of injuries or painful conditions is key to lasting function of your shoulder whether you are a high performance athlete, recreational sports player, workout enthusiast, or an active employee within certain occupations. Pilates is an excellent modality that I often incorporate into my rehabilitation programs as well as Pilates wellness programs to address these shoulder conditions.

The glenohumeral joint is your main shoulder joint. This joint is made up of the humerus bone which sits in a shallow glenoid fossa. This shallow joint socket allows for great mobility but sacrifices stability of the joint. The rotator cuff muscles provide the stability to this joint. Strengthening of these muscles as well as promoting good posture and alignment is important in shoulder injury prevention and providing joint support. It is also important to strengthen the periscapular musculature (the muscles surrounding the shoulder blade and upper back) as these muscles also provide stability and postural control to your shoulder. Other areas of focus when treating a painful shoulder are to address tightness in the shoulder girdle musculature and mobility of the scapula and thoracic spine for overall improved upper extremity range of motion without pain. Muscle imbalances and joint stiffness can often lead to faulty biomechanics. In addition, once injury occurs, faulty mechanics often result due to correct movement patterns being lost.

Pilates helps to correct poor muscle recruitment through postural control, flexibility, strength, and core stabilization. Pilates exercises work to ensure good posture and correct alignment of the shoulder to alleviate destructive forces on the shoulder. This can be done through isolated movements, combination movements, assistive movements specifically with Pilates apparatus, or through more dynamic and sport specific rotational movements combined with core stabilization exercises.

Shoulder impingement can be a painful condition and limit function; however, through positive movement experiences, these conditions can be effectively treated or prevented.

-Julie

Julie is a licensed PT and PMA certified Pilates Instructor

 

Hear From Our Athletes….

Baseball has always been something I loved to play and have fun with it. I was never a “prodigy” or one of the best players on the field. Even coming into my freshman year I still didn’t believe the hype about me, and didn’t understand why so many people believed in me. I always told myself I was too weak and I just wanted to play for fun. As freshman year came to a close I realized this was something I wanted to take to the second step. Throughout high school season I kept hearing more and more about this Coach named Rick Lademann. So one day I approached some guys on the team that trained with him and heard nothing but positive things about him. So of course I had to tell my parents about this guy. When I told my mom about him she went straight on her phone and looked up Beyond Motion. The next day I was at the front desk paying for my first 12 sessions. To this day my parents say it was the best money they ever spent.

As I went through my sessions I noticed some quick changes in my game. My hand speed, my foot work, my leg strength, and mostly my arm strength, never felt this strong. So of course since I was getting so much stronger, my play on the field became eye opening to scouts. I had no idea what I was doing, or how good I became until I got my first call from a D1 school. It was insane hearing how I could impact SEC and ACC schools.

I went from a scrawny little everyday travel ball and babe Ruth baseball player, to a top D1 program recruit. I can easily say it has all happened from the decision from my parents made to send me to Beyond Motion. But I’m not done yet! I haven’t stopped yet. All I can think about now is that I want more, more, more, more. This man has put a new feature in my mind that I never knew. Im not satisfied with what I have right now, I want to get bigger and stronger everyday. I want to be able to tell Pro scouts that Rick Lademann from Beyond Motion trained me to play and look like this. Not only do I want this for myself, but I love being at Beyond Motion with my team and want to lead them to another state appearance.  Im the only kid on the roster this year that has 2 years of varsity under their belt, and have gone through two strong and unbeatable teams. Another year another chapter. RTD!!

Thank you Coach Rick and the Team at Beyond Motion!  

Shane Marshall- 

Developmental Windows of Training for Young Athletes

Developmental Windows of Training for Young Athletes

There’s a lot of debate in the training world on when young athletes should start training programs. As our athletes reach the pre-pubescent years there is something called the developmental window, which starts around age 10 but can vary depending on physical and mental maturity, in which a certain type of training program is extremely beneficial for the athlete. Much like teaching a child to walk, read, or ride a bike, there is a method in which you teach the proper techniques and movements so that they are successful later on with those tasks. Training is much like that, in the sense that you want your athlete’s movement patterns to be engrained the correct way from the start. So by having our younger athlete’s develop strong, stable moves early on in their training years and understanding why they are doing each exercise, they have a strong, stable base to build off of once they are old enough to start the big lifts and the compound movements.

As the younger athletes start coming into us, it is our duty to explain to them that while they may be a specifically a tennis player, or specifically a baseball player, that their training needs to be comprehensive rather than sport specific. At such a young age for the athlete it is paramount that the athlete, as well as the parents, understand that sport specific training may lead to overuse injury as the athlete is continuously repeating the same motion over and over again while ignoring other moves that may aid in strengthening the sport specific move. Training athletes of any age, especially the younger athletes in the developmental window, should be a 100% complete training program and should teach the athlete the importance of each individual move and how they work synergistically to improve their game. As the athlete matures chronologically and training-wise and shows a complete understanding of the reasons, techniques, and importance of each move then we can start teaching sport specific movements and focuses on certain areas of their game.

The developmental window for young athletes is one of the most crucial times during their playing careers. Having the athlete understand and perfect exercises will help them immensely in the future as they will have a strong base to build off of as they mature.

Nick

Train Slow be Slow-Train Fast be Fast

In this day and age everyone is saturated by fitness crazes and information. We’re finding a generation that is paralyzed because of this overload. Let me give you an example, we see quite a few kids that want to work hard. They are athletes that want to make themselves better. Their perception is that if I train as hard as I can on the weights “I will be successful”. These athletes then come out for season and are not seeing the results they thought they would. They are slower, feeling less coordinated, and showing very little fluidity. What they don’t understand is that just squatting, deadlifting, & benching doesn’t translate to the field or court like they thought it would. These athletes come to us dumbfounded. The simple thing I tell them is that you’ve been training your body through slow methodical movements. Don’t get me wrong I love those three lifts, but done alone with no additional training, they are a recipe for disaster.

There are two primary muscle fibers in the body Slow twitch and Fast twitch. All sports are dominated by fast twitch fibers. The old saying “Speed Wins” is very true. The above athlete isn’t training for that explosive force that makes a difference on the field or court. They are slowing themselves down by over emphasizing big slow lifts. They have forgotten that sport is predicated on movement. Patterning movements while engaging in strength movements is essential for development.

Creating a program that incorporates strength, speed, agility, mobility, flexibility, stability, & power are the modalities that we put together so the athlete develops at an exponential rate. The trick is to blend them together so one cycle phases into the next. Of course they will get new stimuli, but they have to understand that the prior phase was necessary in order to develop into the next one. This is not easy for someone to do on their own. There is a reason we have strength coaches – performance coaches, and this is it.

Why are you training? How are you training to achieve that goal? If the answer to the second question is blurry then it’s time to come in for an evaluation and stop doing pause squats at LA Fitness.

Coach Rick is the Co-founder of BEYOND MOTION® and has more than 20 years experience as a Strength & Speed Specialist

Gold-Medal Moves

This is an amazing article from Pilates Style Magazine. Obviously  Kerri Walsh Jennings knows what it takes to become a world class athlete, and she wouldn’t trust her body to just any kind of workouts. Like all athletes training intelligently, Kerri chooses programs that support what her body needs, with coaches that understand how to keep her at the top of her game.   Read on to learn how this Olympic athlete and mom of 3 does what she does.

 

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For most people, winning an Olympic gold medal is a once-in-a-lifetime achievement. But not for Kerri Walsh Jennings: The beach-volleyball legend has won three successive gold medals with her teammate, Misty May-Treanor. And she’s gunning for a fourth at Rio this year—all while raising her three children.

Walsh Jenning’s busy life means making the most out of every workout. “I’m all about training smart,” she says. “I want to spend time with my family, and make sure I’m being a good mom and wife, especially when I’m home, so my trainers and I are all very good about being efficient.” Along with hitting the sand, this Pilates devotee makes a point of spending time on the mat and Reformer. “I’m obsessed,” she says. “It’s helped me so much in my career.” Here, Walsh Jennings shares her favorite moves, workout snacks and time-management advice.

 

PS: How often do you practice Pilates when you’re in training?

KWJ: I’ve been doing Pilates for about 10 to 15 years now. It completely transforms your body—everything from your core to your legs to your back. You realize you have all these new muscles you didn’t know you had. I practice about three times a week with my trainer, Kerry Wachtfogle, on the Reformer, the mat and on the beach.

PS: How do you think Pilates benefits your volleyball?

KWJ: In so many ways! After having three kids and breastfeeding, I had to work really hard to get the strength back in my core and upper back. Pilates played a huge role in that. It keeps me strong and flexible, which are key to preventing injury. On top of that, it’s great for metabolism, confidence, posture and bone density—important for volleyball, but also good perks for women in general.

PS: What are some of your favorite moves?

KWJ: I love the Hundred and the Frog Stretch. That’s where you start on your knees and hands, and walk your hands in front of you. You come to your forearms and move your knees out wider than your hips, and then dip your pelvis to the floor. It really opens your hip flexors and inner thighs.

PS: What does a typical training day look like?

KWJ: It varies day to day, but usually I do about three hours of beach-volleyball practice in the morning. Then I’m either in the gym doing cardio or weightlifting, or doing Pilates. My cardio includes fast-twitch workouts and plyometrics to keep up my agility and endurance. It adds up to about 20 to 30 hours of training per work out. On top of that, there’s brain-training, physical therapy, meeting with my sports psychologist—that’s all very important, too.

PS: What are some of your favorite workout snacks?

KWJ: Before my morning workouts, my go-to snack is a shake. My kids like them, so it works for the whole family. I usually use unsweetened vanilla almond milk, like Almond Breeze, French Vanilla Designer Whey protein, kale or spinach, chia seeds, oats and honey. If I have more time, I make oatmeal with almond milk, and almond butter and banana. Post-workout, it’s important I get protein, so I like to do another shake or a protein bar, or turkey sandwich on Paleo bread with mustard and avocado. I’m a creature of habit—those are my staples!

PS: You obviously have a crazy-busy schedule. Do you have any advice on how you manage the juggle?

KWJ: It’s organized chaos for the most part! While I don’t feel like I’ve perfected the balance by any means, my first piece of advice is to prioritize. I want to be the best mom, wife and athlete I can be, so when I’m feeling overwhelmed, I re-evaluate what’s on my plate and try to get rid of what’s not helping with any of those things. Being present and mindful is really important. So when I’m training, I am 100 percent focused on that. Then when I’m with my family, I’m really there and making the most of that time. Last, but definitely not least, a solid support system makes all the difference. My husband, Casey, and I are a team with our kids, and we’re surrounded my amazing people who support us.

PS: How do you stay motivated?

KWJ: I really love what I do. I love working hard and getting better—and I love winning! I put my full self into everything I do, and I know I have more in me. That’s usually enough motivation for me. I also have incredible family and friends who inspire me and push me to keep going.

(as seen in Pilates Style Magazine online)

How baseball training is evolving

 
Training for baseball, especially for pitchers, used to emphasize aerobic conditioning to the point of exhaustion. The old adage was players should run to build up their stamina and their endurance. As strength and conditioning has evolved, however, more emIMG_0136phasis is being placed on speed and power training rather than steady-state aerobic training.

The reason for this shift in training is due to the fact that we as trainers are becoming more aware of the effects of training the anaerobic components to increase the aerobic. This effect only takes place from anaerobic to aerobic though, it’s essentially just a one-way street; you cannot improve your anaerobic performance by training your aerobic energy systems. So, when baseball players come into Beyond Motion and start training we emphasize training those anaerobic energy systems, the creatine phosphagen system and the fast glycolytic. Being able to training anaerobically while still improving aerobic performance is huge for us, it allows the trainers to make the workouts more interesting and gives us more variety in our programming. With this all being said, ignoring aerobic training completely would be an ill-advised move of course, because to be a strong athlete you have to have balance in your program.Energy Chart Nick Blog

Focusing on these powerful and quick movements relates to on the field movements as well. Baseball is a sport that is short powerful bursts of energy with periods of inactivity, sometimes longs bouts of inactivity. So what we need to do as coaches is train our players for those quick bursts, which could be swinging the bat, tracking down a fly ball, or stealing a base. All of the movements we do in the weight room serve a purpose, gone are the days of lifting like a bodybuilder or running like a marathon runner. Our baseball players train fast and they training strong so they can be at their best on the field.

 

 

-Nick

 

Reference:

https://www.nsca.com/education/articles/methods-for-training-baseball-players/

Rhea, Matthew R. et. Al. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2008. Noncompatibility of Power and Endurance Training Among College Baseball Players