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Naples, FL 34110, US

 

Category Archives: baseball

Baseball Pitching Coach – Greg Dombrowski now at BEYOND MOTION®

We are very fortunate to have Coach Dombrowski join Beyond Motion® this summer for #pitching lessons. Between the analytics, we can offer within the facility and the pro-style mound outside, it’s the perfect set-up for our pitching coach.

As a player, Greg led Rome Free Academy to 2 sectional championships and a trip to the State Final Four in 2003. He was named the Central New York Pitcher of the Year after the 2003 season as well as a 3 time all league, all Central New York and All-State player each of his 3 seasons at RFA. After graduation, he attended the University of Kentucky for four years playing in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) leading UK to their first-ever SEC championship in 2006. In 2006, he led the pitching staff with a 10-2 record and a 2.83 ERA. That year he beat five top 25 nationally ranked teams including a complete game in the NCAA regional over Notre Dame.

Greg played on 3 nationally ranked teams before leaving Kentucky with the second most wins in school history and is still the school record holder in career winning percentage with a 23-5 career record. He was named a 3rd team pre-season All-American his Junior season, an All-South Region performer, and was on the Roger Clemens Award Watch List 3 years, a list comprised of the top 50 pitchers in college baseball and given to the nation’s best.

 

After graduating from Kentucky with a degree in Kinesiology and Health Education, Greg played in the Cincinnati Reds Minor League System before succumbing to a career-ending shoulder injury requiring surgery.

For lessons call
239-254-9300 
ages 10 & up

What is Impingement Syndrome?

A common diagnosis I see as a Physical Therapist is shoulder impingement syndrome. This syndrome involves the rotator cuff and bicep muscles. The syndrome is caused when the tendons become impinged as they pass through the subacromial space or when tendons are irritated by bony osteophytes(spurs) that form in the shoulder girdle. When this repeatedly occurs the tendons become inflamed and shoulder tendonitis develops. If not addressed it can lead to future rotator cuff tears. Prevention of these type of injuries or painful conditions is key to lasting function of your shoulder whether you are a high performance athlete, recreational sports player, workout enthusiast, or an active employee within certain occupations. Pilates is an excellent modality that I often incorporate into my rehabilitation programs as well as Pilates wellness programs to address these shoulder conditions.

The glenohumeral joint is your main shoulder joint. This joint is made up of the humerus bone which sits in a shallow glenoid fossa. This shallow joint socket allows for great mobility but sacrifices stability of the joint. The rotator cuff muscles provide the stability to this joint. Strengthening of these muscles as well as promoting good posture and alignment is important in shoulder injury prevention and providing joint support. It is also important to strengthen the periscapular musculature (the muscles surrounding the shoulder blade and upper back) as these muscles also provide stability and postural control to your shoulder. Other areas of focus when treating a painful shoulder are to address tightness in the shoulder girdle musculature and mobility of the scapula and thoracic spine for overall improved upper extremity range of motion without pain. Muscle imbalances and joint stiffness can often lead to faulty biomechanics. In addition, once injury occurs, faulty mechanics often result due to correct movement patterns being lost.

Pilates helps to correct poor muscle recruitment through postural control, flexibility, strength, and core stabilization. Pilates exercises work to ensure good posture and correct alignment of the shoulder to alleviate destructive forces on the shoulder. This can be done through isolated movements, combination movements, assistive movements specifically with Pilates apparatus, or through more dynamic and sport specific rotational movements combined with core stabilization exercises.

Shoulder impingement can be a painful condition and limit function; however, through positive movement experiences, these conditions can be effectively treated or prevented.

-Julie

Julie is a licensed PT and PMA certified Pilates Instructor

 

Hear From Our Athletes….

Baseball has always been something I loved to play and have fun with it. I was never a “prodigy” or one of the best players on the field. Even coming into my freshman year I still didn’t believe the hype about me, and didn’t understand why so many people believed in me. I always told myself I was too weak and I just wanted to play for fun. As freshman year came to a close I realized this was something I wanted to take to the second step. Throughout high school season I kept hearing more and more about this Coach named Rick Lademann. So one day I approached some guys on the team that trained with him and heard nothing but positive things about him. So of course I had to tell my parents about this guy. When I told my mom about him she went straight on her phone and looked up Beyond Motion. The next day I was at the front desk paying for my first 12 sessions. To this day my parents say it was the best money they ever spent.

As I went through my sessions I noticed some quick changes in my game. My hand speed, my foot work, my leg strength, and mostly my arm strength, never felt this strong. So of course since I was getting so much stronger, my play on the field became eye opening to scouts. I had no idea what I was doing, or how good I became until I got my first call from a D1 school. It was insane hearing how I could impact SEC and ACC schools.

I went from a scrawny little everyday travel ball and babe Ruth baseball player, to a top D1 program recruit. I can easily say it has all happened from the decision from my parents made to send me to Beyond Motion. But I’m not done yet! I haven’t stopped yet. All I can think about now is that I want more, more, more, more. This man has put a new feature in my mind that I never knew. Im not satisfied with what I have right now, I want to get bigger and stronger everyday. I want to be able to tell Pro scouts that Rick Lademann from Beyond Motion trained me to play and look like this. Not only do I want this for myself, but I love being at Beyond Motion with my team and want to lead them to another state appearance.  Im the only kid on the roster this year that has 2 years of varsity under their belt, and have gone through two strong and unbeatable teams. Another year another chapter. RTD!!

Thank you Coach Rick and the Team at Beyond Motion!  

Shane Marshall- 

Developmental Windows of Training for Young Athletes

Developmental Windows of Training for Young Athletes

There’s a lot of debate in the training world on when young athletes should start training programs. As our athletes reach the pre-pubescent years there is something called the developmental window, which starts around age 10 but can vary depending on physical and mental maturity, in which a certain type of training program is extremely beneficial for the athlete. Much like teaching a child to walk, read, or ride a bike, there is a method in which you teach the proper techniques and movements so that they are successful later on with those tasks. Training is much like that, in the sense that you want your athlete’s movement patterns to be engrained the correct way from the start. So by having our younger athlete’s develop strong, stable moves early on in their training years and understanding why they are doing each exercise, they have a strong, stable base to build off of once they are old enough to start the big lifts and the compound movements.

As the younger athletes start coming into us, it is our duty to explain to them that while they may be a specifically a tennis player, or specifically a baseball player, that their training needs to be comprehensive rather than sport specific. At such a young age for the athlete it is paramount that the athlete, as well as the parents, understand that sport specific training may lead to overuse injury as the athlete is continuously repeating the same motion over and over again while ignoring other moves that may aid in strengthening the sport specific move. Training athletes of any age, especially the younger athletes in the developmental window, should be a 100% complete training program and should teach the athlete the importance of each individual move and how they work synergistically to improve their game. As the athlete matures chronologically and training-wise and shows a complete understanding of the reasons, techniques, and importance of each move then we can start teaching sport specific movements and focuses on certain areas of their game.

The developmental window for young athletes is one of the most crucial times during their playing careers. Having the athlete understand and perfect exercises will help them immensely in the future as they will have a strong base to build off of as they mature.

Nick

How baseball training is evolving

 
Training for baseball, especially for pitchers, used to emphasize aerobic conditioning to the point of exhaustion. The old adage was players should run to build up their stamina and their endurance. As strength and conditioning has evolved, however, more emIMG_0136phasis is being placed on speed and power training rather than steady-state aerobic training.

The reason for this shift in training is due to the fact that we as trainers are becoming more aware of the effects of training the anaerobic components to increase the aerobic. This effect only takes place from anaerobic to aerobic though, it’s essentially just a one-way street; you cannot improve your anaerobic performance by training your aerobic energy systems. So, when baseball players come into Beyond Motion and start training we emphasize training those anaerobic energy systems, the creatine phosphagen system and the fast glycolytic. Being able to training anaerobically while still improving aerobic performance is huge for us, it allows the trainers to make the workouts more interesting and gives us more variety in our programming. With this all being said, ignoring aerobic training completely would be an ill-advised move of course, because to be a strong athlete you have to have balance in your program.Energy Chart Nick Blog

Focusing on these powerful and quick movements relates to on the field movements as well. Baseball is a sport that is short powerful bursts of energy with periods of inactivity, sometimes longs bouts of inactivity. So what we need to do as coaches is train our players for those quick bursts, which could be swinging the bat, tracking down a fly ball, or stealing a base. All of the movements we do in the weight room serve a purpose, gone are the days of lifting like a bodybuilder or running like a marathon runner. Our baseball players train fast and they training strong so they can be at their best on the field.

 

 

-Nick

 

Reference:

https://www.nsca.com/education/articles/methods-for-training-baseball-players/

Rhea, Matthew R. et. Al. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research 2008. Noncompatibility of Power and Endurance Training Among College Baseball Players