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Author Archives: BeyondMotion

Cut Your 5K Time With Pilates

Rick found this article in July’s edition of Men’s Health magazine that may be helpful for runners and tri-athletes. Actually, the benefits of Pilates are great for everyone, athlete or not.

We use Pilates in our athlete’s training programs and always notice HUGE benefits in their overall performance. From high school to the pros, everyone always comments about how they feel after their Pilates sessions. There’s truly no better workout to incorporate into your weekly program if you are looking to improve your core strength, flexibility, endurance, body awareness, breath control, and posture.

Ready to try some Mat Pilates at home or on the road?? Check out BEYONDMOTION.TV for some great Pilates workouts for all levels. Have questions? Email us at info@go2beyondmotion.com or comment below.

Baseball Pitching Coach – Greg Dombrowski now at BEYOND MOTION®

We are very fortunate to have Coach Dombrowski join Beyond Motion® this summer for #pitching lessons. Between the analytics, we can offer within the facility and the pro-style mound outside, it’s the perfect set-up for our pitching coach.

As a player, Greg led Rome Free Academy to 2 sectional championships and a trip to the State Final Four in 2003. He was named the Central New York Pitcher of the Year after the 2003 season as well as a 3 time all league, all Central New York and All-State player each of his 3 seasons at RFA. After graduation, he attended the University of Kentucky for four years playing in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) leading UK to their first-ever SEC championship in 2006. In 2006, he led the pitching staff with a 10-2 record and a 2.83 ERA. That year he beat five top 25 nationally ranked teams including a complete game in the NCAA regional over Notre Dame.

Greg played on 3 nationally ranked teams before leaving Kentucky with the second most wins in school history and is still the school record holder in career winning percentage with a 23-5 career record. He was named a 3rd team pre-season All-American his Junior season, an All-South Region performer, and was on the Roger Clemens Award Watch List 3 years, a list comprised of the top 50 pitchers in college baseball and given to the nation’s best.

 

After graduating from Kentucky with a degree in Kinesiology and Health Education, Greg played in the Cincinnati Reds Minor League System before succumbing to a career-ending shoulder injury requiring surgery.

For lessons call
239-254-9300 
ages 10 & up

Suspension Training with Bodhi

The Bodhi Suspension System: A Brief Review

Watch out TRX, there’s a new suspension system out on the fitness scene. The Bodhi suspension system is suspension training with a Pilates twist. Suspension training is a form of resistance training which uses a series of ropes along with your body weight. The ropes are attached to what is referred to as the anchor- a pipe, beam, or ring, either mounted to the wall or suspended from the ceiling. By using handles and/or straps attached to the ropes, you can perform an array of different dynamic movements. You’re basically working against gravity with the goal of developing strength, balance, flexibility, and joint mobility. Bodhi provides two anchor points and four possible points of suspension, whereas the TRX system has only a single anchor and two points of suspension. The additional points of suspension make more variations available and can provide a deeper movement experience.

In this humble Pilates teacher’s opinion; double the suspension, double the fun! 

The creator of the system is a woman named Khita Whyatt. When a car accident left her with significant paralysis to her left side, Khita took control and began conceptualizing her return to health. The shearing injury, which had damaged the connections between the two hemispheres of her brain, impeded communication between the right and left side and made it feel as though her brain could not find the left side and get it to function voluntarily. Along with the disconnect from her left side, she also could no longer contract her deeper muscles, including the transverse abdominals. Because of her strong understanding of the body (Khita was a Rolfer and longtime Pilates practitioner), she knew she would have to develop a system that would re-engage the non-responsive deep and mid layer muscles without being able to consciously feel or contract them. The way, she discovered, was through an anchor and a couple of ropes. Enter Bodhi.

Bodhi means “awaken” in Sanskrit. It was an aptly named system. When your body moves in and out of alignment with gravity, it stimulates a reaction in the deepest muscles; that of “hugging into the bone”. The body has something called the righting reflex, also known as the Labyrinthine righting reflex, for all you nerds out there. It refers to your body’s reflex to correct its orientation when taken out of the upright position. So when you lean into the ropes, it is your body’s reflexive reaction to contract even some of the deepest muscles which also provides support for your joints. You can also modify the intensity of the movement by adjusting your center of gravity, or by deepening the lean. The deeper the lean, the more the stabilizing muscles of the body, including the deep core, spinal erectors, and shoulder girdle have to work. Through her training on the Bodhi, Khita was able to re-educate her neuromuscular system to fire in a coordinated fashion and re-stimulate her sense of stability, mobility, and proper alignment. She has experienced a full recovery and I have been told if you met her, you’d never be able to tell she was partially paralyzed.

The fact that the Bodhi is suspended from two anchor points means you have a more anatomically correct set up which is more kinesthetically pleasing and allows for a greater variety of movement patterns. The Bodhi’s two suspension points also allow for a lot of creativity. When I participated in a Bodhi teacher training, I was amazed at the scope and diversity of the exercises that can be performed on this most simple of designs. Exercises can be done standing, lying face down and on your back (supine and prone, respectively, if you want to get technical) and even lying on your side.  Different points of suspension can be added to each exercise. For example, a row (an exercise where, leaning away from your anchor, you pull your arms toward you body retracting your shoulders together) with both feet planted of the floor feels very different from a row with one leg suspended by a strap. So, regardless of your fitness level, the Bodhi can accommodate your individual needs. An exercise can be of a beginner to an intermediate level or can be more advanced and athletic. As with any session you’ll experience at Beyond Motion, the difficulty level will be adjusted to be appropriate for you.

The Bodhi is a very intuitive system and provides a unique movement experience. We have had a lot of success implementing it into Pilates sessions with all of our clients. It’s a very cool experience that we recommend to anyone looking for a fun, innovative workout that challenges your body in an entirely new way. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and to book a session call 239-254-9300 or email us at: info@go2beyondmotion.com

Jamie

Beyond Motion Staff Personal Jamie

Pilates Day Celebration – Workouts

Every year on the first Saturday of May people around the world celebrate International Pilates Day. Knowing this year Pilates Day also falls on the same day as Cinco De Mayo and the Kentucky Derby, we decided to celebrate with everyone online… allowing you to participate in some of our favorite Pilates moves from the comfort of your own home.

 

 

And stay tuned for more videos and workouts by subscribing to our youtube channel BEYONDMOTION.TV

 

 

Need stronger glutes? Try this glute series and let us know if you’re feeling the burn…

 

 

Looking to build endurance and challenge your core? Try this series of 5… a secret weapon to help develop your six pack.

Is there a difference – strength training for men & women??

We’re often contacted by the media to clarify the misconceptions people have about conditioning and Pilates. This time the Naples News Magazine – SPOTLIGHT contacted Rick to help identify the differences of strength training for both men & women.

Anyone exploring weightlifting programs as a way to reach optimum fitness may wonder, “Are different exercises recommended for women versus men?” Surprisingly not.

“Essentially, there is no difference,” said Rick Lademann, owner and strength training director at Beyond Motion fitness center in Naples. “I find the same principles apply to both men and women.”

Men obviously have more testosterone, the hormone responsible for muscle building, but women have it, too. In a good strength training routine, testosterone rises as the amount of weight lifted and intensity of the exercise increase

click here to read the full story

Rick Ladesmann Owner Beyond Motion

 

 

 

How Chris Sale is grooming Jason Groome- from ESPN

For the past several years we have watched Chris Sale develop into the pitcher he is today. For more than five years he has trained at BEYOND MOTION to increase his strength and speed with a program that includes 5 days a week of training and Pilates. This year he showed Jason Groome the ropes, as he brought him into his world at BEYOND MOTION.

 

 

“I thought one of my buddies was playing a prank on me,” Groome says.

But it wasn’t a joke. And later that day, Groome went to meet with Sale and Lademann.

Click here to read more about Chris and Jason

 

 

What you may, or may not know about Pilates.

WHAT YOU MAY, OR MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT PILATES

Pilates. You’ve heard it’s hard, it’s just for women, it’s the same thing as yoga, it’s too expensive, it’s not really a workout, it’s for the flexible dancer types……  Well, let’s set a few things straight.

IT’S HARD… OR… IT’S NOT A “REAL” WORKOUT… 

Well, of course, it’s hard, and anyone that says it’s not really a workout has probably not tried it yet. How often do you practice table top position on your back with your head and chest curled up while pumping your arms by your sides as you inhale 5 times, then exhale 5 times, repeating 10 times with no break in between? Be prepared to use muscles you didn’t know existed. And, trying to get your mind to connect with what your body is doing, well, some of us have that problem with simple everyday tasks. Now add instructors watching and correcting your every move to make sure each movement is perfectly executed. Oh, and did we mention eyes up, head up, chin up, and don’t forget to breathe!

The plus side is that when you stick with it, you will see and feel a difference. You will notice your posture improve, increased flexibility, and your mind and body will start to work together creating more efficient movement in your daily life. You will increase core and back strength, and improve balance, all which help to prevent injuries.

 

IT’S JUST FOR WOMEN AND FLEXIBLE DANCER TYPES…

Don’t tell that to all the athletes that use Pilates as part of their cross-training. Pilates is known for targeting specific muscle groups that get neglected with regular weight training, therefore creating total body strength and functionality. Everyone, men and women, need increased core strength and flexibility.

And did we mention, Pilates was created by a man? Joseph Pilates was a gymnast, bodybuilder, professional boxer, and a self-defence trainer for police officers in places like Scotland Yard.  

 

WHAT KIND OF MEN DO PILATES???

https://www.buzzfeed.com

golfers
baseball coaches
soccer players

           

IT’S THE SAME AS YOGA, RIGHT???

While Pilates and yoga both utilize a mat, Pilates can also be done on specific equipment that adds extra resistance. Yoga is considered spiritual, Pilates is more of a mind and body connection. Both help with flexibility, but Pilates helps increase core strength, therefore, improving overall body movement efficiency.  To truly understand the differences between Pilates and yoga, try them both. You cannot compare one to the other if you have only tried one.

 

PILATES IS EXPENSIVE…. 

The initial costs of Pilates can be a deterrent. But if you are serious about your health and fitness it is an investment to last a lifetime. Private Pilates sessions are equivalent to the costs of personal training. Both equally worth it. Pilates instructors go through very rigorous training to obtain their certifications, therefore you are receiving in-depth knowledge on how to correctly execute each Pilates move and the Pilates principles. After you learn the basics, costs can be minimized by joining group classes, whether on mat or equipment.

 

Hopefully, this gives you a better understanding of why Pilates is a game changer to an over-all cross-training program. Incorporating Pilates into your weekly workout schedule will help target areas that weight training alone often misses. Think of it as an investment in your health and physical fitness. It is for people looking to increase flexibility, core strength, prevent injuries, and build a stronger physical foundation.

 

What is Impingement Syndrome?

A common diagnosis I see as a Physical Therapist is shoulder impingement syndrome. This syndrome involves the rotator cuff and bicep muscles. The syndrome is caused when the tendons become impinged as they pass through the subacromial space or when tendons are irritated by bony osteophytes(spurs) that form in the shoulder girdle. When this repeatedly occurs the tendons become inflamed and shoulder tendonitis develops. If not addressed it can lead to future rotator cuff tears. Prevention of these type of injuries or painful conditions is key to lasting function of your shoulder whether you are a high performance athlete, recreational sports player, workout enthusiast, or an active employee within certain occupations. Pilates is an excellent modality that I often incorporate into my rehabilitation programs as well as Pilates wellness programs to address these shoulder conditions.

The glenohumeral joint is your main shoulder joint. This joint is made up of the humerus bone which sits in a shallow glenoid fossa. This shallow joint socket allows for great mobility but sacrifices stability of the joint. The rotator cuff muscles provide the stability to this joint. Strengthening of these muscles as well as promoting good posture and alignment is important in shoulder injury prevention and providing joint support. It is also important to strengthen the periscapular musculature (the muscles surrounding the shoulder blade and upper back) as these muscles also provide stability and postural control to your shoulder. Other areas of focus when treating a painful shoulder are to address tightness in the shoulder girdle musculature and mobility of the scapula and thoracic spine for overall improved upper extremity range of motion without pain. Muscle imbalances and joint stiffness can often lead to faulty biomechanics. In addition, once injury occurs, faulty mechanics often result due to correct movement patterns being lost.

Pilates helps to correct poor muscle recruitment through postural control, flexibility, strength, and core stabilization. Pilates exercises work to ensure good posture and correct alignment of the shoulder to alleviate destructive forces on the shoulder. This can be done through isolated movements, combination movements, assistive movements specifically with Pilates apparatus, or through more dynamic and sport specific rotational movements combined with core stabilization exercises.

Shoulder impingement can be a painful condition and limit function; however, through positive movement experiences, these conditions can be effectively treated or prevented.

-Julie

Julie is a licensed PT and PMA certified Pilates Instructor

 

Hear From Our Athletes….

Baseball has always been something I loved to play and have fun with it. I was never a “prodigy” or one of the best players on the field. Even coming into my freshman year I still didn’t believe the hype about me, and didn’t understand why so many people believed in me. I always told myself I was too weak and I just wanted to play for fun. As freshman year came to a close I realized this was something I wanted to take to the second step. Throughout high school season I kept hearing more and more about this Coach named Rick Lademann. So one day I approached some guys on the team that trained with him and heard nothing but positive things about him. So of course I had to tell my parents about this guy. When I told my mom about him she went straight on her phone and looked up Beyond Motion. The next day I was at the front desk paying for my first 12 sessions. To this day my parents say it was the best money they ever spent.

As I went through my sessions I noticed some quick changes in my game. My hand speed, my foot work, my leg strength, and mostly my arm strength, never felt this strong. So of course since I was getting so much stronger, my play on the field became eye opening to scouts. I had no idea what I was doing, or how good I became until I got my first call from a D1 school. It was insane hearing how I could impact SEC and ACC schools.

I went from a scrawny little everyday travel ball and babe Ruth baseball player, to a top D1 program recruit. I can easily say it has all happened from the decision from my parents made to send me to Beyond Motion. But I’m not done yet! I haven’t stopped yet. All I can think about now is that I want more, more, more, more. This man has put a new feature in my mind that I never knew. Im not satisfied with what I have right now, I want to get bigger and stronger everyday. I want to be able to tell Pro scouts that Rick Lademann from Beyond Motion trained me to play and look like this. Not only do I want this for myself, but I love being at Beyond Motion with my team and want to lead them to another state appearance.  Im the only kid on the roster this year that has 2 years of varsity under their belt, and have gone through two strong and unbeatable teams. Another year another chapter. RTD!!

Thank you Coach Rick and the Team at Beyond Motion!  

Shane Marshall- 

Meet Me at the Gym: Fitness class fuses barre, Pilates, yoga, ballet= Barre Motion Classes

Meet Me at the Gym is an occasional Tuesday column about Southwest Florida group exercise classes. Wellness reporter Shelby Reynolds finds the newest workout crazes, unique locations and the interesting people behind them, then gives them a try so you know what to expect. 

Knowing very well I was out of shape after Hurricane Irma interrupted my workout schedule, the ballet barre seemed a little intimidating.

I imagined having to hoist my leg over the top and perform some kind advanced ballet maneuver that would surely split my yoga pants.

Luckily, I was wrong.

On a recent Tuesday morning, I found my place at the barre in Amy Lademann’s fusion fitness class alongside about 10 other women. Outfitted with floor discs, a stretchy exercise band, yoga mat, 3-pound dumbbells and a miniature exercise ball, I was armed for class.

Barre motion combines conditioning elements of barre, Pilates, yoga and ballet designed to target major muscle groups, burn calories, increase flexibility and improve posture.

Lademann and her husband, Rick, opened Beyond Motion in 2009 in the Riverbend Plaza in North Naples off U.S. 41 just north of Immokalee Road. The studio is washed in white and turquoise blue, with pretty hardwood floors. Natural light cascades through a wall of windows on one side.

Other classes include strength training and Pilates bootcamp.

In addition to group fitness classes, Beyond Motion also offers massage therapy, Pilates and personal training. They train anyone from high school athletes and teams to professionals from the NFL and MLB.

Lademann has experience teaching about every exercise program under the sun. She grew up dancing and cheerleading. She studied martial arts in college and started teaching aerobics, yoga and NIA dance, a workout program popular in the ’80s and ’90s that fused martial arts and modern dance.

 

 

Through it all, she battled pain from sciatica.

“Yoga and dance was making me hurt,” she said. “Pilates was the one thing that took my pain away.”

After moving to Naples 13 years ago, Lademann continued to instruct Pilates, yoga and barre, but dreamed of forming her own program at her own studio.

“I wanted to be able to package it all together so that by the end of the class (students) had moved every part of their body without feeling cheated,” she said.

So Beyond Motion was born, and along with it the Barre Motion group fitness class two years later.

Group fitness classes can be purchased in packages of five, 10, 15 or 20 classes, which expire four months after the date of purchase. Drop-in classes cost $20.

Each class is different, from the music to the movement. While most barre classes focus on small pulse movements, Lademann leads her students through an interval-style class mixed with that and some low-impact cardio.

“You will probably leave sweaty,” she warned before class. She was right.

On that Tuesday morning, we started with a quick full-body warm-up and moved right into an upper body strength section using dumbbells. We worked shoulders, especially, with raises and lifts. I was happy to start with 3-pound dumbbells, while my more experienced classmates used 5 pounds and heavier.

We moved through each piece of equipment from there, doing bursts of cardio and stretches in between.

The elastic band wrapped around our ankles, we did squats and leg lifts, using the barre for balance. As a beginner, some of the squats in first- and third-position (there’s the ballet influences) felt a little uncomfortable, but Lademann made quick work of correcting my form.

By the time we got to the inflated exercise ball wedged between our thighs, my legs were shaking, and the lower body movements didn’t stop there. We used the floor discs for lunges and more squats.

 

Next was core on the mat. Here comes more shaking.

We ended with a cool down and full-body stretches

It’s not uncommon to find fusion fitness classes with elements of different forms of exercise — martial arts and kickboxing, ballet and barre, plyometrics and weight training.

“It allows you to get a taste of more than one modality,” Lademann said.

And you have the benefit of a full-body workout. After barre motion my muscles — especially lower body — were sore for several days. My initial fears of the barre were unnecessary. I tackled the barre and many other movements that were completely new to me before walking into the Beyond Motion studio.

“When I grew up dancing you left it all on the floor,” Lademann said. “I want everybody to feel they did everything they feel they could.”

Barre Motion at Beyond Motion

  • Sweat scale: 3 out of 5 drops
  • What to bring: Water and a towel
  • When: 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, Friday and Saturday; 6 p.m. Wednesday
  • Where: Beyond Motion, 11985 U.S. 41 N., North Naples
  • Cost: $20 for drop-in class; $90 for five classes; $160 for 10 classes; $210 for 15 classes; $240 for 20 classes
  • More information:go2beyondmotion.com; 239-254-9300

 

 

 

http://www.naplesnews.com/story/life/diet-fitness/2017/10/16/meet-me-gym-fitness-class-fuses-barre-pilates-yoga-ballet/737433001/